U.S. HEALTH ALERT - COVID-19 UPDATE

Updated on 13 May 2020


The Situation:

Currently, the U.S. has at least 1,408,636 confirmed cases – the highest in the world – with 348,655 of those located in New York - accounting for 8% of cases worldwide. Additionally, New Jersey has 142,079 cases and Illinois has 83,021 cases. Together, the top three states, New York, New Jersey, and Illinois, account for 40% of all cases in the U.S – totaling 573,755.

There have been 296,746 recorded recoveries and 83,425 recorded deaths. On 23 April, the U.S. recorded its highest daily death toll with 3,332 deaths in 24 hours.

CDC adds six symptoms to Covid-19 list: chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell.

Under CDC guidelines states should report case numbers, including probable cases, and deaths, including probable deaths.


Many states’ stay-at-home/shelter-in-place orders have expired. Safer-at-home orders and phased reopening plans have been enacted in a majority of states in place of shelter-in-place orders. It is possible that states may extend or alter the guidelines. Expiratory dates and guidelines are subject to change (Please see below for updated State-by-State measures for lifting restrictions).


Travel Restrictions and Recommendations:

  • On March 14, the Department of State authorized the departure of U.S. personnel and family members from any diplomatic or consular post in the world who have determined they are at higher risk of a poor outcome if exposed to COVID-19 or who have requested departure based on a commensurate justification. These departures may limit the ability of U.S. Embassies and consulates to provide services to U.S. citizens.

  • Canada and the U.S. mutually decided to close border on 18 March. As of April 18, the U.S./ Canadian Border will remain closed for an additional 30 days.

  • U.S. Department of State issues Global Level 4 Health Advisory – Do Not Travel on 19 March: The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19.

o In countries where commercial departure options remain available, U.S. citizens who live in the U.S. should arrange for immediate return, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.

o U.S. citizens who live abroad should avoid all international travel. Many countries are experiencing COVID-19 outbreaks and implementing travel restrictions and mandatory quarantines, closing borders, and prohibiting non-citizens from entry with little advance notice.

  • Airlines have cancelled many international flights and several cruise operators have suspended operations or cancelled trips.

  • On March 20, land ports of entry along the United States-Mexico border were limited to “essential travel” until April 20. This was extended to May 30.

  • Current CDC Travel Alerts for Covid-19:

o Level 3 – Avoid all nonessential travel: Brazil, Canada, Israel, Japan, China, Europe, Italy, Iran, Malaysia, South Korea, UK and Ireland and Cruise ships

o Level 2 – Practice Enhanced Precautions

* Global COVID-19 Outbreak Notice

o As of April 3, the CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

* Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

Symptoms to Watch Out For:

Officials say the respiratory disease, is capable of spreading through human-to-human contact, droplets carried through sneezing and coughing, and germs left on inanimate objects. The virus might spread during the incubation period – which is believed to be from 1 to 14 days. Be on the lookout for the following symptoms:

  • High fever

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

  • Cough (usually dry)

  • Sore throat

  • Chills, sometimes with repeated shaking

  • Headache

  • Fatigue

  • Muscle aches or pain

  • Diarrhea, nausea, and/or vomiting

  • Loss of smell and/or taste (uncommon

  • Confusion, stroke-like symptoms, and/or seizures (rare)

  • Pneumonia (secondary infection)


Mitigating Measures to Apply while in the US:

  • Monitor local authorities for updates

  • Avoid non-essential travel to areas where the infection is known or spreading rapidly

  • Travelers who return from infected areas should self-quarantine

  • Practice social distancing at the workplace and in public spaces

  • Consider work from home arrangements for employees in locations where the virus is spreading or if employees must transit through those areas

  • Employees who feel ill or who have flu-like, respiratory or other symptoms should consider self-quarantine and or stay at home instead of attending office or other functions

  • Weigh the risks of conducting large scale gatherings where the virus is located and the potential for attendees to transit through higher risk areas

  • Avoid contact with animals (alive or dead), animal markets, and products that come from animals (such as uncooked meat)

  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water; use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water isn’t available

  • Older travelers and those with underlying health issues may be at higher risk and should speak to their healthcare provider before travel

  • Avoid exposure to those presenting the above symptoms

  • Avoid populated areas and gatherings if you feel ill (if at all possible)

  • Allow extra time for temperature screening at airports

  • Seek medical care immediately if you experience symptoms and have recently traveled to the infected areas; notify your healthcare provider of your recent travel

  • Some airlines and airports may require use of a mask at the facility and while aboard the aircraft. Confirm with your airline current policies in place.

  • Confirm travel schedule is not impacted by the coronavirus (including quarantines, which may be individually-imposed, visit/visa restrictions etc.)

  • Ensure the validity of all visas prior to travel as this could be subject to restrictions and changes


Affected Travelers and others:

All travelers have the potential for exposure


Plans for Lifting Restrictions by State (Current as of 12 May):

  • Alabama- Alabama's stay-at-home order expired April 30. A new ‘Safer-at-Home’ Order will go into effect at 5 p.m. on April 30 until May 22 All retail businesses can reopen with a 50 percent occupancy rate, restaurants may open with restrictions. Beaches are open and elective medical procedures can resume. Barbershops and salons will remain closed for the initial phase of re-opening. Gatherings should still be limited to 10 people, expect in a workplace.

  • Alaska- Alaska's stay-at-home order expired April 21. Phase 2 of Alaska’s Reopen Responsibly plan began on 8 May. Nonessential medical procedures restarted May 4. Retail stores and restaurants were allowed to reopen at 50% capacity. Personal services were allowed to reopen with a 1:1 ratio. Gyms and recreational facilities were allowed to reopen at 25%. K-12 schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Arizona- Arizona's stay-at-home order was extended to May 15. Elective medical procedures are allowed to resume May 1 with restrictions. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 4, Retail stores my begin opening for curbside pick-up and delivery.

o Navajo Nation extended the closure of their government until May 17.

  • Arkansas- Arkansas does not have a stay-at-home order. Gov. Hutchinson launched said he hopes to begin to ease restrictions in the state on May 4. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 4, gyms and fitness centers may open. On May 11, restaurants may begin dine-in services at reduced capacity.

  • California- There is no set end date for California's stay-at-home order. Some restrictions, such as masks in restaurants and bans against large gatherings, may stay in place through the summer. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Responses vary between counties. California is allied with Oregon and Washington to coordinate reopening. On May 8, California entered Stage 2 of ‘California’s Pandemic Roadmap,’ altering the state-wide stay-at-home order. This is allowing retail businesses and childcare to reopen under specific guidelines. On May 12, California certified seven counties to reopen additional businesses, including allowing dine-in restaurants, with restrictions.

  • Colorado- Colorado’s stay-at-home order expired April 26. Social distancing measures will remain in place until further notice. On April 26, the state entered a "safer at home" phase, where residents are recommended to stay home but not required to. Small businesses and personal services were allowed to reopen. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Some localities have set their own pace for reopening and have delayed entry into the safer at home phase. Denver initiated the “Safer at home” phase on May 8.

  • Connecticut- Connecticut’s entered a stay safe, stay home order set to expire May 20. Connecticut is allied with Delaware, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey and Rhode Island in a multistate effort to coordinate reopening.

  • Delaware- Delaware's stay-at-home order lasts until May 15. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • District of Columbia- The city's stay-at-home order expires May 15. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Florida- Florida’s stay-at-home order expired April 30. On April 17, Beaches reopened for “essential activities” in parts of the state. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Gov. DeSantis will be beginning a reopening plan called ‘Safe. Smart. Step-by-Step’ through executive order. On May 4, restaurants and retail stores will be allowed to reopen at 25% capacity and social distancing. Elective surgeries will be allowed to resume.

  • Georgia- Georgia’s stay-at-home order expired April 30, however, older persons and the chronically ill, must remain sheltered-in-place through June 12. On April 24, some businesses, including gyms and hair salons are allowed to reopen and elective surgeries may resume. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Distancing rules limiting the number of customers remain in effect through May 13. Bars, nightclubs, swimming pools and amusement parks will closed through May 13.

  • Hawaii- Hawaii’s stay-at-home order was extended to May 31, however beaches will be reopened for exercise and elective surgeries may resume. Gov. Ige has said he’s taking a “phased-in” approach to reopening the state for business. On May 7, select non-essential businesses were allowed to reopen. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Idaho- Idaho’s stay-at-home order expired April 30. Some churches and nonessential businesses may reopen on May 1 with strict distancing rules. All school reopening decisions belong to the State Board of Education.

  • Illinois- Illinois's stay-at-home order was extended until May 30. Gov Pritzker is coordinating reopening the state with the governors of Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. On May 1, some businesses were allowed to reopen for curbside pickup or delivery. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Indiana- Indiana's stay-at-home order expired May 1. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 4, non-essential retail businesses were allowed to open at 50% capacity. On May 11, restaurants and personal care services may be allowed to reopen.

  • Iowa- Iowa had the equivalent of a stay-at-home order until April 30. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 1, restaurants, fitness centers, malls, and several other business categories in 77 of Iowa's 99 counties may reopen at 50% capacity.

  • Kansas- Kansas’s stay-at-home order expired May 3. Non-essential retailers and restaurants were allowed to open on May 4. The governor’s goal for reopening personal care businesses, bars, and casinos, is May 18. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Kentucky- Kentucky’s "Healthy at Home" order has no set end date. Gov. Beshear recommended schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Tentatively: On May 22, restaurants will be allowed to reopen with 33% capacity. On June 1, movie theaters and fitness centers may reopen. On June 11, campground may reopen andon June 15, child care may resume with reduced capacity.

  • Louisiana- Louisiana's stay-at-home order was extended to May 15. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Restaurants are now allowed to open outdoor seating areas, with no table-side services. Shopping malls were allowed to reopen for curbside services.

  • Maine- Maine’s stay-at-home order was extended to May 31. Gov. Mills is planning a "phased-in" reopening. Some state parks, carwashes, and personal services will be able to open on 1 May. Drive-in theaters, vehicle religious services, and golf will be allowed.

  • Maryland- Maryland have no set end date for its stay-at-home order or its executive order to wear face coverings in any retail business or on public transportation. Schools are closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 7, some beaches were allowed to reopen for outdoor exercise and fishing- with restrictions. Boating, hunting, camping, and horse-back riding are also allowed.

  • Massachusetts- Massachusetts’ stay-at-home advisory was extended to May 18. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Daycares are closed until the end of June.

  • Michigan- Michigan’s stay-at-home was extended to May 28. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Lawn service companies, landscapers, plant nurseries and bike repair shops may reopen but must follow social distancing rules. 

  • Minnesota- Minnesota’s stay-at-home order was extended to May 18. On April 18, recreational activities, including golfing, boating, fishing, hunting and hiking were allowed to restart. On May 4, retail business may open for curbside pickup and delivery. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Mississippi- Mississippi's stay-at-home order expired April 27. The state entered a ‘Safer-at-home’ order effective 27 April at 0800 for at least two weeks. Retail stores may reopen at half capacity. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Missouri- Missouri's stay-at-home order expired May 3. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Effective May 4, all businesses were allowed to reopen- while following social distancing guidelines. Some local governments are choosing to keep stricter rules in place.

  • Montana- Montana’s stay-at-home order expired April 24. Gov. Bullock announced a phased reopening starting April 26. On May 4, restaurants, bars, and casinos were allowed to reopen (with reduced capacity). On May 7, schools were allowed to reopen- at the discretion of the local districts.

  • Nebraska- Nebraska does not have a stay-at-home order. On May 4, restaurants, personal- care services, and day cares were allowed to reopen at lower capacities. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Nevada- Nevada's stay-at-home order ends was extended to May 15. As of May 1, all retail businesses, will be allowed to operate under a “curbside commerce model”

  • New Hampshire- New Hampshire's governor issued a stay-at-home 2.0 order that expires May 31. On May 1, state parks and campgrounds may open. On May 4, hospitals may relax restrictions on elective procedures. On May 11, retail stores may reopen at 50% capacity, personal services may reopen with restrictions, golf courses with restrictions and drive-in theaters may reopen. On May 18, restaurants will be allowed to open at reduced capacity. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • New Jersey- New Jersey's stay-at-home order does not have an end date. Schools in the state are closed until May 15.

  • New Mexico- New Mexico’s stay-at-home order ends May 15. On May 1, retailers were allowed to reopen for curbside service. Pet services were allowed to reopen . Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • New York- New York’s stay-at-home order lasts until May 15. Schools are also closed until May 15. NYC Mayor de Blasio has closed schools through the rest of the school year and cancelled nonessential events through June.

  • North Carolina- North Carolina's stay-at-home order expires May 8. Gov. Cooper is planning to extend the order to May 22, while loosening restrictions under a 3-phase plan. Nonessential retail businesses were allowed to reopen at 50% capacity and childcare facilities were allowed to reopen. Schools are closed through the rest of the academic year.

  • North Dakota- North Dakota does not have a stay-at-home order. Nonessential businesses are closed in the state through April 30. On May 1, all businesses were allowed to reopen with restrictions. Schools are closed “until further notice” but school facilities are allowed to reopen for some activities in May.

  • Ohio- Ohio’s stay-at-home order was extended to May 29. Gov. DeWine says the state will begin to reopen with a “phased-in” approach. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 1, Health procedures that don't require an overnight stay can begin. On May 4, general office spaces, distribution centers, manufacturing centers and construction can continue. On May 12, consumers, retail and services can reopen.

  • Oklahoma- Oklahoma’s “safer-at-home” order expired May 6. On April 24, previously suspended elective surgeries resumed, state parks opened, and hair and nail salons were allowed to reopen. On May 1, bars and gatherings with more than ten people were allowed. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Oregon- Oregon’s stay-at-home order does not have an end date. On May 1, "non-urgent" medical procedures may restart. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Pennsylvania- Pennsylvania's stay-at-home order expires May 8 for 24 counties in the northcentral and northwestern areas of the state. Gov. Wolf has plans to ease restrictions starting on construction, curbside alcohol pickup and vehicle sales. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Rhode Island- Rhode Island's stay-at-home order expired May 8. Schools are closed for the remainder of the academic year. Non-essential retail businesses may reopen with limited capacity, non-critical medical appointments may resume, and state parks may reopen.

  • South Carolina- South Carolina's "state of emergency" order closing all nonessential businesses way extended to May 15. On April 20, some public beaches and retail stores were allowed to reopen with limited capacity. Public schools are closed through the remainder of the academic year.

  • South Dakota- South Dakota does not have a stay-at-home order. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Tennessee- Tennessee's stay-at-home order expired April 30. The state entered a ‘Safer-At-Home’ order effective as of April 29 and will remain in effect until 11:59 p.m., May 29. Gov. Lee stated that many businesses would be allowed to re-open on May 1. On April 24, state parks and dine-in restaurants were allowed to reopen at reduced capacity. Decisions to reopen schools belongs to individual districts.

  • Texas- Texas’s stay-at-home order ended April 30. On April 20, state parks reopened. On April 24, stores may start offering “retail to go”. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. Retail stores, malls, restaurants, libraries, museums, and theaters to will be allowed to reopen May 1 but with limited occupancy to 25%.

  • Utah- Utah’s equivalent of a stay-at-home order expired May 1. Gov. Herbert issued an order under ‘moderate’ risk in effect from May 1 to May 16. He plans reopen the state in three phases starting at the beginning of May with sit-down dining, gyms and elective surgeries. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Vermont- Vermont’s stay-at-home order ends May 15. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On April 20, "low contact" businesses were allowed to begin reopening with a two-person staff.

  • Virginia- Virginia's stay-at-home order expires June 10. K-12 Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Washington- Washington’s stay-at-home order was extended to May 31. Gov. Inslee said the state is not close to reopening. Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year. On May 5, golfing, fishing, hunting, and use state parks and public lands may resume.

  • West Virginia- West Virginia’s stay-at-home order expired May 4, a Safer-at-Home order was issued in its place. Some businesses have been allowed to reopen but are not required to. Schools and businesses remain closed the remainder of the academic year.

  • Wisconsin- Wisconsin’s stay-at-home order expires May 26. On April 29, businesses that do not require customer contact was allowed to resume, outdoor recreation rentals may resume, and non-essential retail may open for curbside service. K-12 Schools are to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.

  • Wyoming- Wyoming does not have a stay-at-home order. Orders prohibiting gatherings of 10 or more, closing schools have been extended to May 15. On May 1, Gyms, barber shops, hair salons and other personal care services will be allowed to open, with restrictions.


DISCLAIMER and Hold Harmless

Disclaimer: LSDS™ gathers information from multiple sources and offers insight and perspective to travelers. Sources cannot be validated for accuracy in every instance. Travelers assume all risk associated with their travel and are responsible for the decisions associated with travel and for their own safety. Users of this reference document agree, to hold harmless LSDS™ (LLC) its employees and clients associated with any risk or injury incurred during travel.

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